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Saturday, March 26, 2016

Compelling Video Exposes The Harm Of Objectifying Women [Must Watch]

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The #WomenNotObjects campaign wants advertisers to know that consumers are fed up with how females are portrayed in the media.

You may not personally know the woman on the television screen, but if your beloved sister, mother or cousin were in her place, would it change the way you viewed the advertisement being broadcasted?

A powerful new campaign is asking just this, more or less, by exposing just how terrifying it is for women to continually be the focus of objectification in the media.

The pressure to be ‘model thin’ and have airbrushed looks has caused a dizzying amount of women in the U.S. (75%, to be precise) to develop some form of eating disorder.

If they’re not obsessed with achieving a thigh gap, they’re likely attempting to plump their lips to Kylie Jenner standard. But, Women Not Objects argues, enough is enough.

Young girls and mature women are going to extreme lengths to try and achieve nearly impossible standards of beauty portrayed by the media. In effect, the female collective is being harmed in more ways than one.

“Girls are growing up thinking that how they look is more important than how they feel, or who they are and what they can do,” relays the video.

Women – and men – are more than their physical appearance. However, society’s mentality concerning this issue is not likely to change until content shared by the media is revised, as well.

Truly, when the cultural “ideal” is unattainable, everyone fails.

Compelling Video Exposes The Harm Of Objectifying Women [Must Watch]
Women Not Objects

You can get involved and “be the change” by submitting ads that contain questionable or dangerous imagery on the project’s website.
Will you stand up for your future and share this article?

Source: True Activist

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1 comment:

  1. Great article. I can really relate, having worked in the adult industry (internet sector) for the last 19 years. In fact, I was one of the original camgirls, so I guess you could say I made a career out of being objectified. It wasn't long before the cliches, stereotypes and objectifications wore on me, but rather than leave the industry, I forced myself to grow numb to it. In a way, I felt like I had brought it on myself. My choices were either learn to accept it or defend myself every time I came across someone who felt the need to try to belittle me. The mannerisms, behaviour, poses, strut, flirtations, right down to the lingo I used online differed almost completely from who I was in real life. I am slightly reserved and dress casual, sometimes conservative. If I wore a cleavage-bearing top, they were paired with pants or sweatpants, never a mini skirt. I never dressed to impress anyone but myself. A sharp contrast to the stripper I was online, who wore things like stilettoes, Daisy Dukes and other items I wouldn't be caught wearing outside, if even just to run to the car. What i did on the internet, stayed on the internet. It was in front of my video camera, in the privacy of my own home. The controlling pimps in my industry, with as much class as subway rats, not only objectify women but steal from them, mentally abuse them, harrass them and treat them as though they should be lucky to have a job, rather than being thankful that these women are even willing to line their pockets week after week, despite the peanuts they actually get to keep for themselves. That's my story in the smallest of nutshells. Another angle perhaps, but under the same umbrella. Women need to be empowered, not belittled and we need to stand up for ourselves, not allow ourselves to be pushed down.


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