This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at Privilege

This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at Privilege

Toby Morris describes himself as “an Auckland-based illustrator, art director, comic artist and recently the author of Don't Puke On Your Dad: A Year in the Life of a New Father.”

His recent comic, The Pencilsword's “On a Plate” illustrates the concept of privilege, and presents the reality that should make us think!

Toby Morris positions two humans side by side, demonstrating how financial security and benefits, or the deficiency of it, affects them even if they come from families that love and support them, resulting to two entirely different outcomes.

A short story about privilege.

This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at Privilege
Thewireless

This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at PrivilegeThewireless

This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at PrivilegeThewireless

This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at PrivilegeThewireless

Let's hope this comic changed your mind about privilege, the way it did ours and let's be more grateful!

Sources: Toby Morris, The Wireless

Related:
This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at Privilege This Comic Will Forever Change the Way You Look at Privilege Reviewed by Katerina Pap on 5:56 PM Rating: 5

3 comments

  1. Hi, I'd be Paula in this scenario. That being said, I had opportunities some really poor or third world kids didn't have, but I also didn't have anything like "Richard" had. I was raised by my a single parent dad. He worked hard, still does. He probably will never get to retire, nor will I. But if I had worked harder, I could have changed that outcome for myself and for my children, and so on. We are not entirely victim to circumstance, we have choices, even if they are limited. And often, we can reach beyond what we think and feel our choices really are. I'm a white male. That doesn't make me privileged or racist or sexist or any other undue title you want to heap on my narrow shoulders. It doesn't define who I am no more than my name does. My actions and my choices, not my circumstances are what makes me who I am.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I Understand now that the circumstances of one's birth are irrelevant, it is what we do with the gift of life that determines who you are. - Mewtwo

      Delete
  2. Right. So the fact that my parents saved, sacrificed, and stayed together so that my siblings and I could achieve is "white privilege"?

    Is "white privilege" a secret code word for "I'm jealous and angry that I don't have what you have"? It sure seems like that. Penis envy is unbecoming of one who claims to be part of "thinking humanity".

    What's the phrase for people of color who share "Richard's" lottery-winning situation? They're out there, you know.

    I feel sorry for you and your ilk. With apologies to George Bailey, what a warped, frustrated man you are.

    ReplyDelete

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