Snowden Archive: Everything You Need To Know About Modern Spying

Snowden Archive: Everything You Need To Know About Modern Spying

NSA's confidential documents from Edward Snowden's leaks are now published. Intercept.com, co-founded by Glenn Greenwald, who was one of the first people to interview Snowden in 2013, mentioned that it would "invite journalists from all over the world to cooperate with them in order to investigate Snowden's archive".

This decision can lead to new revelations after those of 2013; Snowden, former NSA contractor, left the USA having collected many documents that revealed NSA and others American companies' spying. Since NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed the extent of secret government mass surveillance programs, including how they plug into consumer digital services to harvest massive volumes of data on web users, spy agencies have clearly decided that they need to step up their PR game as a strategy to tackle greater levels of public scrutiny being applied to what were previously very shadowy processes.

Snowden outlines his views on the present state of journalism and the increasing role that those in power play in controlling it in an interview he gave to the Columbia Journalism Review.

“One of the most challenging things about the changing nature of the public’s relationship to media and the government’s relationship to media is that media has never been stronger than it is now,” Snowden says. “At the same time, the press is less willing to use that sort of power and influence because of its increasing commercialization.” (source)


Snowden, now living in Russia, handed over the documents to reporter Glenn Greenwald, who published many of the juiciest disclosures at the Guardian. Greenwald left the Guardian and took the documents with him to The Intercept, which announced Monday that it is beginning a public document dump of the goods provided by Snowden. Today, The Intercept is releasing its first batch of many classified documents—166 articles of the NSA's internal newsletter called SIDtoday. (source)

The site explained:

The Intercept’s first SIDtoday release comprises 166 articles, including all articles published between March 31, 2003, when SIDtoday began, and June 30, 2003, plus installments of all article series begun during this period through the end of the year. Major topics include the National Security Agency’s role in interrogations, the Iraq War, the war on terror, new leadership in the Signals Intelligence Directorate, and new, popular uses of the internet and of mobile computing devices.

The files are being uploaded here

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Snowden Archive: Everything You Need To Know About Modern Spying Snowden Archive: Everything You Need To Know About Modern Spying Reviewed by Katerina Pap on 3:18 AM Rating: 5

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