A Black Woman Confronted Neo-Nazis And The KKK. Watch What Happened Next!

A Black Woman Confronted Neo-Nazis And The KKK. Watch What Happened Next.

They called her a ´hybrid´ and told her to go back to Africa. You won't believe how she reacted.


This woman showed us what really happens when someone questions the motives of racists. This excerpt from a BBC documentary called 'Confronting Racism Face-to-Face' features a gutsy mixed race journalist who shows incredible bravery when dealing with intimidating bigots who most of us would cross the street to avoid.

The woman, who was born in Germany, asks Neo-Nazi skinheads what they are demonstrating against. At first, they ignore her, turn their backs or tell her to leave. But she refuses, and asks them intelligent questions that make them cringe with embarrassment at their own beliefs. She smiles at them. Her calm and collected manner makes them look more ridiculous than ever, and she shows them that she is also a human being, even though they call her an "enemy".

She later travels to the USA and makes a guy in a KKK costume so uncomfortable that he claims “I´m not racist”. She even gets a hug from one lifelong bigot, and in the end, she makes friends with a young skinhead, leaving us with a surprising fact about her white grandmother. She is really inspiring, isn't she?

Related:
A Black Woman Confronted Neo-Nazis And The KKK. Watch What Happened Next! A Black Woman Confronted Neo-Nazis And The KKK. Watch What Happened Next! Reviewed by Katerina Pap on 4:37 AM Rating: 5

3 comments

  1. These are the actions that change the world, and change hearts. The anger and outrage promoted by a handful, black and white, is not changing the world. In the 1960s, it was not the Black Panthers and riots in the streets that changed our laws; it was the work of people like Martin Luther King, who stood staunchly by his beliefs, but by holding up a model of hope, of love and showed white people something they could love and admire, and the world responded.

    We have made great progress, but there are a handful of narrowminded people that still want to live in the racists past. There are still legacies from the outright discrimination that gave black people a poorer education, propagated through generations, as today's kids grow up without the support of well-educated parents who make them do homework and study.

    These are the problems we need to fix, but we will not fix them from a state of outrage, but of realistically seeing just what is truly there, seeing what can be fixed and seeing what changes in social policy are needed to continue the progress we have made.

    Even recently, we have seen symbols of racial hatred removed from state buildings. This was not done in response to the outrage and riots over Ferguson, which only made things worse. But the outpouring of love to see decent people killed in Charleston and the loving response of family members that forgave, and prayed, not for a white man that took black lives, but prayed to God to reconnect with a man who had lost contact with God.

    That accomplished in days that decades of anger and outrage failed to accomplish.

    Good for all who can respond as this woman did; good for all who can see this and understand the ways forward. She makes me proud to be a human being, and proud in what the United States really IS trying to accomplish.

    ReplyDelete
  2. These are the actions that change the world, and change hearts. The anger and outrage promoted by a handful, black and white, is not changing the world. In the 1960s, it was not the Black Panthers and riots in the streets that changed our laws; it was the work of people like Martin Luther King, who stood staunchly by his beliefs, but by holding up a model of hope, of love and showed white people something they could love and admire, and the world responded.

    We have made great progress, but there are a handful of narrowminded people that still want to live in the racists past. There are still legacies from the outright discrimination that gave black people a poorer education, propagated through generations, as today's kids grow up without the support of well-educated parents who make them do homework and study.

    These are the problems we need to fix, but we will not fix them from a state of outrage, but of realistically seeing just what is truly there, seeing what can be fixed and seeing what changes in social policy are needed to continue the progress we have made.

    Even recently, we have seen symbols of racial hatred removed from state buildings. This was not done in response to the outrage and riots over Ferguson, which only made things worse. But the outpouring of love to see decent people killed in Charleston and the loving response of family members that forgave, and prayed, not for a white man that took black lives, but prayed to God to reconnect with a man who had lost contact with God.

    That accomplished in days that decades of anger and outrage failed to accomplish.

    Good for all who can respond as this woman did; good for all who can see this and understand the ways forward. She makes me proud to be a human being, and proud in what the United States really IS trying to accomplish.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very brave action! You have my respect!

    ReplyDelete

Don't show again. Close

Like us on Facebook?